Landlord Tips & Tricks

What Needs to be Included in a 30-Day Notice to Vacate Letter

There are a few reasons landlords may need to issue a notice to vacate letter to tenants. Maybe the landlord is selling the property, or maybe the property is being remodeled and the tenants need to be relocated. Maybe the tenants are not following the lease agreement, or maybe they have not paid rent. Whatever the reason, the landlord needs to issue a notice to vacate letter to tenants to let them know that they need to leave the property.

A landlord notice to vacate letter is a formal letter that a landlord sends to a tenant to give notice that they need to move out of the property. This letter is most typically used when a tenant has not paid rent, has caused damage to the property, or has violated the terms of their lease agreement.

Why is a Notice to Vacate Letter Important?

A 30-day notice to vacate letter is important for landlords because it allows them to regain possession of their property and avoid potential legal action. This type of notice must be given to the tenant in writing, and it must specify the date on which the tenancy will end. The landlord must also provide a reason for the eviction, such as non-payment of rent or damage to the property. Once the notice has been served, the tenant has 30 days to vacate the premises. If they do not do so, the landlord can file an eviction action with the court.

It is important for landlords to include certain information in their 30-day notice to vacate letter in order for the tenant to have a clear understanding of their rights and obligations. This includes the date of the notice, the landlord's contact information, the reason for the eviction, and the date by which the tenant must vacate the premises. The 30-day notice to vacate letter should also contain a statement that the tenant has the right to contest the eviction in court.

When Does a Landlord Need to Issue a 30-day Notice to Vacate Letter?

A notice to vacate letter is typically used by landlords when they want their tenants to leave the property. This could be for a number of reasons, such as if the tenant has not paid rent, has caused damage to the property, or is otherwise not following the terms of their lease. 

A landlord should write a 30-day notice to vacate letter in order to give the tenant adequate time to find another place to live. The landlord should state in the letter the date by which the tenant must vacate the premises, and the reason for the eviction. The landlord should also include a clause that allows the tenant to cure the default if possible.

Related Reading: A Landlord's Guide to Writing a Notice to Vacate

What Would Cause a Landlord to Issue a Notice to Vacate Letter?

There are many reasons a landlord may issue a notice to vacate, ranging from the tenant not paying rent to the tenant causing damage to the property. Other reasons can include the tenant having too many people living in the unit, the tenant engaging in illegal activities, or the landlord needing to make repairs to the unit. In some cases, the landlord may simply want the unit back so they can move in themselves or rent it to someone else once the lease expires. No matter the reason, the landlord must include the specific cause for issuing the notice in the notice itself.

Some common reasons landlords issue a letter to vacate include:

  • The tenant has not paid rent
  • The tenant has caused damage to the property
  • The tenant has been disruptive to other tenants or the neighborhood
  • The tenant has been convicted of a crime
  • The tenant has violated the terms of the lease agreement
  • The lease is ending soon and you don't want to renew the lease
  • The property has been sold and the new owner does not wish to continue the lease agreement
  • The landlord needs the property for personal use
  • The property is going to be demolished or renovated and the tenant needs to be relocated

If the lease may be ending and the landlord don't wish to renew

In most states, both the tenant and the landlord have a right to decide whether to continue renting the property. A landlord may be selling the property, want to renovate, or find a replacement tenant. Issuing the tenant a 30-day notice to vacate just to inform them they need to seek alternative housing arrangements and move out.

If the tenant stopped has stopped paying rent

In this scenario, you’ll need to provide a notice to vacate with the cause for removal. Prior to issuing the notice, you should provide the tenant a “Pay Rent or Quit” notice detailing how much they owe, along with a deadline to get caught up. If the tenant does not pay the back rent, you can then issue a notice to vacate or start eviction proceedings.

If the tenant has violated the terms of their lease

If a tenant has broken any rules specified in the lease, they're in breach of their signed contract. Send a notice of termination of the lease, but like the failure to pay rent scenario, the best option is to provide them with a warning first. Send a letter to the tenant detailing the violation, such as a no-pet or no-smoking policy, and provide them with a short amount of time to correct the violation. If they fail to respond to your written request, you can then send a notice of termination of the lease, with cause.

Related Reading: A Guide on Tenant Eviction

What Should a Landlord Include in a Notice to Terminate Lease?

There are a number of reasons why it is important for landlords to correctly word a termination of lease letter. First and foremost, it is important to ensure that all legal requirements are met in order to avoid any potential legal action from the tenant. Secondly, correctly wording the termination letter can help to avoid any confusion or misunderstanding between the landlord and tenant. Finally, correctly wording the termination letter can help to set the tone for any future communication between the landlord and tenant.

A landlord must give a tenant written notice to terminate the lease. The notice must say when the lease will end and must be signed by the landlord or the landlord’s authorized representative or attorney. The notice must be given to the tenant:

  • By personal delivery
  • By leaving it with someone at the tenant’s home or business who is at least 18 years old
  • By sending it by first-class, certified mail to the tenant’s last known address

The notice must say that the lease will end on a certain date and that the tenant must move out by that date. The date must be at least 30 days from the date the notice is given. For example, if the landlord gives the notice on January 1, the earliest the lease can end is February 1.

The notice must be in writing and must be signed by the landlord or the landlord’s authorized representative.

How to Properly Write a Notice to Vacate Letter

According to LegalZoom, you should write your landlord-to-tenant notice to vacate letter on official company letterhead and include the following information:

  • Date of the notice
  • Tenant’s name and rental address
  • A request asking the tenant to vacate the rental by a specific date, typically at least 30 days out
  • The reason for termination if there is cause
  • Reference to the section in the lease which allows you to terminate the agreement
  • Move-out instructions, including keys, must be returned and the tenant must leave the premises in “broom-clean” or “good” condition
  • The time and date you’d like to do the final walk-through of the property
  • A request for the tenant’s new mailing address where the security deposit (minus any damages) will be returned to

How to Correctly Deliver a notice to Vacate Letter

The proper way for a landlord to serve a notice to vacate letter is to give the tenant written notice of their intention to terminate the lease. The notice should be given in accordance with the lease agreement and state the specific reason for the eviction. The landlord should also include a date by which the tenant must vacate the property.

A notice to vacate is always going to offend some tenants, whether they think they deserve it or not. For this reason, it’s best not to deliver the notice in person. Also, if you decide to leave the notice on their doorstep or tape it to the door, it is easy for a tenant to deny they ever received it, which could make it harder to evict them if it comes down to it.

Most landlords think it’s better to mail the letter via certified mail rather than to personally confront the tenants. Sending the letter by certified mail ensures your tenant receives it by requiring that the notice is personally signed for by someone living in the residence.

It’s essential for a landlord to issue a notice to vacate correctly to avoid any potential legal problems. If a landlord does not give the proper notice, the tenant may be able to sue the landlord. By following all state and local laws pertaining to tenant eviction, a landlord ensures that a tenant is served notice to vacate the premises properly, making it more difficult for them to drag out or fight the eviction in court.

Table of Contents

Why is a Notice to Vacate Letter Important?

When Does a Landlord Need to Issue a 30-day Notice to Vacate Letter?

What Would Cause a Landlord to Issue a Notice to Vacate Letter?

What Should a Landlord Include in a Notice to Terminate Lease?

How to Properly Write a Notice to Vacate Letter

How to Correctly Deliver a notice to Vacate Letter

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