Laws
February 5, 2024

Eviction Process in Maine - 2024 Guide

Steadily's blog cover page for information around landlord insurance.

The eviction process in Maine follows a specific set of legal procedures designed to protect both landlords and tenants. Landlords must adhere to the Maine Revised Statutes when seeking to evict a tenant for reasons such as non-payment of rent, lease violations, or significant property damage. Tenants, on the other hand, are granted certain rights and protections, including the right to receive appropriate notice and the opportunity to address the issues for which eviction is sought. Consider the foresight of obtaining landlord insurance in Maine prior to the formal commencement of the rental agreement.


Understanding the steps involved in the eviction process is crucial for both parties. It begins with establishing legal grounds for eviction, followed by serving the tenant with an eviction notice. If the issue is not resolved, legal proceedings may then be initiated. The process culminates with a court decision, after which further actions are governed by the outcome of the case. Additionally, it's important to consider the practical aspects and timelines of eviction, as well as the potential for alternative dispute resolution.

Key Takeaways

  • Maine's eviction laws require landlords to follow set procedures for evictions.
  • Tenants in Maine have rights that include notice and the chance to remedy issues.
  • Eviction cases may lead to court decisions that dictate subsequent actions.

Understanding Maine Eviction Laws

The eviction process in Maine is governed by strict statutes that outline the legal grounds for eviction and the respective rights and responsibilities of landlords and tenants in the landlord-tenant relationship.

Eviction Laws and Legal Grounds

In Maine, a landlord may initiate an eviction for various reasons, including nonpayment of rent, violation of lease terms, property damage, or engaging in illegal activity on the premises. To begin the process, the landlord must provide the tenant with a written notice, the duration of which varies depending on the reason for eviction. For instance, for nonpayment of rent, tenants receive a 7-day notice, whereas for a lease violation, the period extends to 30 days. It's important to note that Maine's eviction laws require adherence to a specified timeline and legal procedure.

Rights and Responsibilities

Both landlords and tenants have specific rights and responsibilities under Maine eviction laws. Landlords are obliged to maintain the property according to health and safety standards and must follow the legal eviction process without resorting to self-help measures, like changing locks or removing tenant property. Tenants have the right to receive proper notice before eviction proceedings commence and the right to contest the eviction in court. Moreover, tenants are responsible for upholding the terms of their lease and remedying any violations to avoid eviction.

Establishing Grounds for Eviction

Landlords in Maine must have legal grounds to initiate an eviction process. They are required to adhere to the lease agreement and state laws, ensuring any eviction is justifiable and procedurally correct.

Lease Violations

Lease agreements outline specific conditions that tenants must follow. Violation of lease terms constitutes grounds for eviction when tenants fail to comply with agreed-upon rules. This can include unauthorized occupants, improper use of the property, or other breaches as specified in the lease.

Nonpayment of Rent

One of the most common grounds for eviction is nonpayment of rent. In Maine, landlords must provide a notice allowing the tenant a chance to pay the past due amount. Failure to remedy the situation within the notice period can lead to an eviction action.

Damage or Safety Issues

Tenants are expected to maintain the premises without causing substantial damage or creating health or safety violations. If such issues arise and the tenant does not correct them, this can lead to eviction for cause. Landlords must provide proper notice to the tenant, specifying the violation and the need for repair or remedy.

The Eviction Notice

In Maine, the eviction process begins with the proper delivery of an eviction notice. The type of notice varies depending on the reason for eviction and must meet state legal requirements to be valid.

Types of Eviction Notices

Maine law recognizes several types of eviction notices, each applicable under specific circumstances. The notices inform tenants of the grounds for eviction and provide a time frame for remedy or vacating:

  • 7-Day Notice: This notice is issued for lease violations. Tenants are given seven days to remedy the violation or vacate the premises.
  • 30-Day Notice: Employed for tenancies at will, or without a lease, where the landlord or tenant decides to end the tenancy without cause, providing a 30-day period to vacate.

Additionally, there is a Notice to Quit, which is utilized for serious breaches, including illegal activities, where tenants may be given less time to leave the property.

Serving the Eviction Notice

The service of an eviction notice must follow Maine's service of process laws to be legally effective:

  1. Personal Delivery: The landlord or an agent can hand the notice directly to the tenant.
  2. Substitute Service: If the tenant is unavailable, it may be left with a suitable aged person at the residence, and a copy mailed.
  3. Posting and Mailing: If neither of the above is possible, the notice can be posted conspicuously on the property and a copy mailed.

Service of Process Fees may apply and can vary depending on the method used and whether a professional process server or law enforcement officer is involved. The delivery of a written notice is crucial in initiating the eviction process, and meticulous record-keeping of service ensures the landlord can proceed with a legal case if necessary.

Legal Proceedings

The eviction process in Maine is initiated through a Forcible Entry and Detainer action, requiring proper filing with the District Court. A clear sequence of events involving court filings, summons, and hearings determine the result of the eviction.

The Forcible Entry and Detainer Action

In Maine, landlords initiate evictions by filing a Forcible Entry and Detainer (FED) action. The steps involve:

  1. Serving a written notice to the tenant, stating the reason for eviction.
  2. Filing a Summons and Complaint with the appropriate District Court.
  3. Paying filing fees, the cost of which can vary by location.

The Summons and Complaint is a critical document that informs the tenant of the formal legal action and the need to appear in court.

The Court Hearing

After the Summons and Complaint are served, the eviction process continues to a court hearing. Key points include:

  • The tenant must be provided with a Summons to a hearing, stating the date, time, and location.
  • During the hearing, both parties present evidence and arguments before a judge.
  • After considering all information, the Court issues a Judgment.
  • If the judgment is in favor of the landlord, a Court Order is issued for the tenant's eviction.

It's essential for both the landlord and the tenant to adhere to the proper legal procedure to ensure a fair outcome.

After the Court Decision

Following an eviction hearing, the essential steps involve the issuance of a Writ of Possession and the role of the Sheriff in executing the eviction.

Issuing of Writ of Possession

If the court rules in favor of the landlord, they will issue a Writ of Possession, which signals the legal end to the tenant's right to remain on the property. The writ informs the tenant that they must vacate the premises within a specified period, typically 48 hours.

Role of the Sheriff

Upon the Writ of Possession being issued, the Sheriff's office is tasked with enforcing the writ. Once the deadline for the tenant to vacate has passed, the Sheriff can physically remove the tenant and their possessions from the property. The sheriff ensures the eviction process follows the legal order, maintaining peace while executing the court's decision.

Tenant Rights and Protections

Tenants in Maine are entitled to legal protections that ensure fair treatment and safety. These rights are specifically outlined to prevent discrimination and to provide support for victims of domestic violence.

Protection Against Discrimination

In Maine, tenants are safeguarded by both federal and state laws from discrimination in housing. The Fair Housing Act prohibits landlords from discriminating against tenants based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, or disability. Maine state law further extends these protections to include sexual orientation, gender identity, ancestry, and receipt of public assistance.

Domestic Violence Considerations

Maine law provides specific rights for tenants who are victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking. These protections allow for the termination of a lease without penalty, and landlords are prohibited from disclosing the victim's status and location.

  • Documentation: Police reports, court orders, or other official documents may be required.
  • Legal Protections:
    • Early Lease Termination: Victims can terminate leases early with proper documentation (Pine Tree Legal Assistance - PTLA.org).
    • Lock Changes: Landlords may be required to change locks at the tenant’s request.

Practical Aspects of Eviction

In the eviction process in Maine, landlords must navigate handling a tenant’s property post-eviction and must adhere to strict guidelines regarding changing locks and utility services. These procedures are in place to protect tenant rights and avoid illegal eviction practices.

Handling Tenant's Property

After an eviction, landlords in Maine are responsible for the storage of a tenant's personal property. Items must be stored for a minimum of seven days. In this period, tenants may reclaim their property, usually upon payment of associated storage costs. If the property remains unclaimed after the notice period, the landlord may dispose of it.

  • Storage: Secure and accessible location for the tenant's personal property
  • Personal Property: Includes all items belonging to the tenant within the rental unit

Changing Locks and Utility Services

Maine law restricts landlords from unilaterally changing locks as a form of eviction. Known as "lockouts," this practice is often illegal and can lead to landlord penalization. The correct eviction procedure through the court must be followed before altering access to the rental unit.

  • Locks: Can only be changed following court-sanctioned eviction
  • Utilities: Landlords are prohibited from interrupting services (e.g., electricity, water, heat) to force a tenant out

Alternative Dispute Resolution

In Maine, tenants and landlords can use Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) to settle eviction disputes without going to court. ADR offers a way to resolve eviction issues collaboratively.

Mediation and Settlement

Mediation is a process in which a neutral third party, known as a mediator, facilitates communication between the landlord and tenant to find a mutually acceptable solution. It's typically less formal and less adversarial than a traditional eviction lawsuit. In Maine, mediation is available or may be required for cases involving eviction, and is provided through the Court Alternative Dispute Resolution Service (CADRES).

The goal of mediation in an eviction lawsuit is to avoid the litigation process, which can be costly and time-consuming for both parties. During mediation, landlords and tenants discuss the eviction circumstances and negotiate terms that could prevent the eviction from proceeding. This can include payment plans for overdue rent, agreements on property repairs, or a timeline for the tenant to vacate the property voluntarily.

If the two parties settle the dispute, they can enter into a binding agreement that outlines the terms of their resolution. If a tenant is contesting the eviction, mediation can provide an avenue for them to explain their position and negotiate an alternative to displacement. However, if an agreement cannot be reached through mediation, the landlord may continue with the legal process to contest the eviction in court.

Eviction Timelines and Processes

In Maine, the eviction process is a legal procedure with specific steps and timeframes that must be followed by landlords when removing tenants from a property.

Timeline of Eviction

Notice Period: A landlord must begin the eviction with a proper notice to the tenant. For nonpayment of rent, the landlord must provide a 7-Days Notice to Pay. This notice informs the tenant that they have 7 days to pay or must vacate the premises. The timeline can vary depending on the grounds for eviction, but generally, the process can take from 1 to 2 months from start to finish.

  • Filing the Complaint: If the tenant fails to comply with the notice, the landlord may file an eviction complaint with the court.
  • Court Hearing and Judgment: After filing, a hearing is scheduled, usually within 10 days. If the judge rules in favor of the landlord, a writ of possession is issued, giving the tenant a final deadline to leave.
  • Execution of Eviction: If the tenant still remains, law enforcement officials enforce the writ of possession, physically removing the tenant from the property.

Tenant's Options to Contest

Tenants in Maine have several options to contest an eviction:

  • Appeal: They can challenge the eviction in court if they believe it is unlawful or if due process was not followed.
  • Defenses: Tenants may present legal defenses, such as improper notice or retaliation.
  • Payment of Rent: During the notice period for nonpayment of rent, tenants can pay the owed rent to avoid eviction under Maine law.

Maine's eviction procedures are designed to be fair and just to both landlords and tenants, ensuring that the rights of both parties are protected during the eviction process.

Frequently Asked Questions

The eviction process in Maine is structured and regulated by state law, ensuring landlords have clear guidelines for legally removing a tenant. Tenants also benefit from knowing their rights during this process.

How long does it typically take to complete an eviction in Maine?

The duration of the eviction process in Maine can vary, typically taking from a few weeks to a few months depending on court schedules and the specific circumstances of the case. Information on the steps and timeline of eviction can be crucial for both landlords and tenants to understand the expected timeframe.

What are the legal reasons a landlord can evict a tenant in Maine?

Landlords in Maine have the legal right to evict tenants for reasons including non-payment of rent, violation of lease terms, and causing significant damage to the property. Detailed descriptions of these grounds for eviction are outlined in the Maine Revised Statutes.

Under Maine law, is it possible to evict a tenant during the winter months?

It is a common misconception that tenants cannot be evicted during the winter; however, Maine law does not prohibit winter evictions. Landlords must still follow the proper legal procedures regardless of the season.

What are the necessary steps to evict someone who has no lease agreement in Maine?

To evict a tenant without a lease, often referred to as a tenant at will, a landlord must provide a written notice to quit, respecting the notice period required by law. The subsequent steps remain similar to the standard eviction process.

How much is a landlord expected to spend on the eviction process in Maine?

The cost to evict a tenant in Maine can include court fees, service fees, and attorney fees if the landlord chooses representation. These costs can be substantial and may vary based on the complexity of the eviction case.

What is the procedure to evict a roommate or a tenant at will in Maine?

Evicting a roommate or a tenant at will requires serving an appropriate notice to quit. In the case of a roommate, if they are a co-tenant on the lease, standard eviction procedures apply. If not on the lease, they may be evicted as a tenant at will, but the notice period provided must be followed, and landlords should follow the legal process carefully to ensure compliance with state laws.


Download your free resource

The eviction process in Maine follows a specific set of legal procedures designed to protect both landlords and tenants. Landlords must adhere to the Maine Revised Statutes when seeking to evict a tenant for reasons such as non-payment of rent, lease violations, or significant property damage. Tenants, on the other hand, are granted certain rights and protections, including the right to receive appropriate notice and the opportunity to address the issues for which eviction is sought. Consider the foresight of obtaining landlord insurance in Maine prior to the formal commencement of the rental agreement.


Understanding the steps involved in the eviction process is crucial for both parties. It begins with establishing legal grounds for eviction, followed by serving the tenant with an eviction notice. If the issue is not resolved, legal proceedings may then be initiated. The process culminates with a court decision, after which further actions are governed by the outcome of the case. Additionally, it's important to consider the practical aspects and timelines of eviction, as well as the potential for alternative dispute resolution.

Key Takeaways

  • Maine's eviction laws require landlords to follow set procedures for evictions.
  • Tenants in Maine have rights that include notice and the chance to remedy issues.
  • Eviction cases may lead to court decisions that dictate subsequent actions.

Understanding Maine Eviction Laws

The eviction process in Maine is governed by strict statutes that outline the legal grounds for eviction and the respective rights and responsibilities of landlords and tenants in the landlord-tenant relationship.

Eviction Laws and Legal Grounds

In Maine, a landlord may initiate an eviction for various reasons, including nonpayment of rent, violation of lease terms, property damage, or engaging in illegal activity on the premises. To begin the process, the landlord must provide the tenant with a written notice, the duration of which varies depending on the reason for eviction. For instance, for nonpayment of rent, tenants receive a 7-day notice, whereas for a lease violation, the period extends to 30 days. It's important to note that Maine's eviction laws require adherence to a specified timeline and legal procedure.

Rights and Responsibilities

Both landlords and tenants have specific rights and responsibilities under Maine eviction laws. Landlords are obliged to maintain the property according to health and safety standards and must follow the legal eviction process without resorting to self-help measures, like changing locks or removing tenant property. Tenants have the right to receive proper notice before eviction proceedings commence and the right to contest the eviction in court. Moreover, tenants are responsible for upholding the terms of their lease and remedying any violations to avoid eviction.

Establishing Grounds for Eviction

Landlords in Maine must have legal grounds to initiate an eviction process. They are required to adhere to the lease agreement and state laws, ensuring any eviction is justifiable and procedurally correct.

Lease Violations

Lease agreements outline specific conditions that tenants must follow. Violation of lease terms constitutes grounds for eviction when tenants fail to comply with agreed-upon rules. This can include unauthorized occupants, improper use of the property, or other breaches as specified in the lease.

Nonpayment of Rent

One of the most common grounds for eviction is nonpayment of rent. In Maine, landlords must provide a notice allowing the tenant a chance to pay the past due amount. Failure to remedy the situation within the notice period can lead to an eviction action.

Damage or Safety Issues

Tenants are expected to maintain the premises without causing substantial damage or creating health or safety violations. If such issues arise and the tenant does not correct them, this can lead to eviction for cause. Landlords must provide proper notice to the tenant, specifying the violation and the need for repair or remedy.

The Eviction Notice

In Maine, the eviction process begins with the proper delivery of an eviction notice. The type of notice varies depending on the reason for eviction and must meet state legal requirements to be valid.

Types of Eviction Notices

Maine law recognizes several types of eviction notices, each applicable under specific circumstances. The notices inform tenants of the grounds for eviction and provide a time frame for remedy or vacating:

  • 7-Day Notice: This notice is issued for lease violations. Tenants are given seven days to remedy the violation or vacate the premises.
  • 30-Day Notice: Employed for tenancies at will, or without a lease, where the landlord or tenant decides to end the tenancy without cause, providing a 30-day period to vacate.

Additionally, there is a Notice to Quit, which is utilized for serious breaches, including illegal activities, where tenants may be given less time to leave the property.

Serving the Eviction Notice

The service of an eviction notice must follow Maine's service of process laws to be legally effective:

  1. Personal Delivery: The landlord or an agent can hand the notice directly to the tenant.
  2. Substitute Service: If the tenant is unavailable, it may be left with a suitable aged person at the residence, and a copy mailed.
  3. Posting and Mailing: If neither of the above is possible, the notice can be posted conspicuously on the property and a copy mailed.

Service of Process Fees may apply and can vary depending on the method used and whether a professional process server or law enforcement officer is involved. The delivery of a written notice is crucial in initiating the eviction process, and meticulous record-keeping of service ensures the landlord can proceed with a legal case if necessary.

Legal Proceedings

The eviction process in Maine is initiated through a Forcible Entry and Detainer action, requiring proper filing with the District Court. A clear sequence of events involving court filings, summons, and hearings determine the result of the eviction.

The Forcible Entry and Detainer Action

In Maine, landlords initiate evictions by filing a Forcible Entry and Detainer (FED) action. The steps involve:

  1. Serving a written notice to the tenant, stating the reason for eviction.
  2. Filing a Summons and Complaint with the appropriate District Court.
  3. Paying filing fees, the cost of which can vary by location.

The Summons and Complaint is a critical document that informs the tenant of the formal legal action and the need to appear in court.

The Court Hearing

After the Summons and Complaint are served, the eviction process continues to a court hearing. Key points include:

  • The tenant must be provided with a Summons to a hearing, stating the date, time, and location.
  • During the hearing, both parties present evidence and arguments before a judge.
  • After considering all information, the Court issues a Judgment.
  • If the judgment is in favor of the landlord, a Court Order is issued for the tenant's eviction.

It's essential for both the landlord and the tenant to adhere to the proper legal procedure to ensure a fair outcome.

After the Court Decision

Following an eviction hearing, the essential steps involve the issuance of a Writ of Possession and the role of the Sheriff in executing the eviction.

Issuing of Writ of Possession

If the court rules in favor of the landlord, they will issue a Writ of Possession, which signals the legal end to the tenant's right to remain on the property. The writ informs the tenant that they must vacate the premises within a specified period, typically 48 hours.

Role of the Sheriff

Upon the Writ of Possession being issued, the Sheriff's office is tasked with enforcing the writ. Once the deadline for the tenant to vacate has passed, the Sheriff can physically remove the tenant and their possessions from the property. The sheriff ensures the eviction process follows the legal order, maintaining peace while executing the court's decision.

Tenant Rights and Protections

Tenants in Maine are entitled to legal protections that ensure fair treatment and safety. These rights are specifically outlined to prevent discrimination and to provide support for victims of domestic violence.

Protection Against Discrimination

In Maine, tenants are safeguarded by both federal and state laws from discrimination in housing. The Fair Housing Act prohibits landlords from discriminating against tenants based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, or disability. Maine state law further extends these protections to include sexual orientation, gender identity, ancestry, and receipt of public assistance.

Domestic Violence Considerations

Maine law provides specific rights for tenants who are victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking. These protections allow for the termination of a lease without penalty, and landlords are prohibited from disclosing the victim's status and location.

  • Documentation: Police reports, court orders, or other official documents may be required.
  • Legal Protections:
    • Early Lease Termination: Victims can terminate leases early with proper documentation (Pine Tree Legal Assistance - PTLA.org).
    • Lock Changes: Landlords may be required to change locks at the tenant’s request.

Practical Aspects of Eviction

In the eviction process in Maine, landlords must navigate handling a tenant’s property post-eviction and must adhere to strict guidelines regarding changing locks and utility services. These procedures are in place to protect tenant rights and avoid illegal eviction practices.

Handling Tenant's Property

After an eviction, landlords in Maine are responsible for the storage of a tenant's personal property. Items must be stored for a minimum of seven days. In this period, tenants may reclaim their property, usually upon payment of associated storage costs. If the property remains unclaimed after the notice period, the landlord may dispose of it.

  • Storage: Secure and accessible location for the tenant's personal property
  • Personal Property: Includes all items belonging to the tenant within the rental unit

Changing Locks and Utility Services

Maine law restricts landlords from unilaterally changing locks as a form of eviction. Known as "lockouts," this practice is often illegal and can lead to landlord penalization. The correct eviction procedure through the court must be followed before altering access to the rental unit.

  • Locks: Can only be changed following court-sanctioned eviction
  • Utilities: Landlords are prohibited from interrupting services (e.g., electricity, water, heat) to force a tenant out

Alternative Dispute Resolution

In Maine, tenants and landlords can use Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) to settle eviction disputes without going to court. ADR offers a way to resolve eviction issues collaboratively.

Mediation and Settlement

Mediation is a process in which a neutral third party, known as a mediator, facilitates communication between the landlord and tenant to find a mutually acceptable solution. It's typically less formal and less adversarial than a traditional eviction lawsuit. In Maine, mediation is available or may be required for cases involving eviction, and is provided through the Court Alternative Dispute Resolution Service (CADRES).

The goal of mediation in an eviction lawsuit is to avoid the litigation process, which can be costly and time-consuming for both parties. During mediation, landlords and tenants discuss the eviction circumstances and negotiate terms that could prevent the eviction from proceeding. This can include payment plans for overdue rent, agreements on property repairs, or a timeline for the tenant to vacate the property voluntarily.

If the two parties settle the dispute, they can enter into a binding agreement that outlines the terms of their resolution. If a tenant is contesting the eviction, mediation can provide an avenue for them to explain their position and negotiate an alternative to displacement. However, if an agreement cannot be reached through mediation, the landlord may continue with the legal process to contest the eviction in court.

Eviction Timelines and Processes

In Maine, the eviction process is a legal procedure with specific steps and timeframes that must be followed by landlords when removing tenants from a property.

Timeline of Eviction

Notice Period: A landlord must begin the eviction with a proper notice to the tenant. For nonpayment of rent, the landlord must provide a 7-Days Notice to Pay. This notice informs the tenant that they have 7 days to pay or must vacate the premises. The timeline can vary depending on the grounds for eviction, but generally, the process can take from 1 to 2 months from start to finish.

  • Filing the Complaint: If the tenant fails to comply with the notice, the landlord may file an eviction complaint with the court.
  • Court Hearing and Judgment: After filing, a hearing is scheduled, usually within 10 days. If the judge rules in favor of the landlord, a writ of possession is issued, giving the tenant a final deadline to leave.
  • Execution of Eviction: If the tenant still remains, law enforcement officials enforce the writ of possession, physically removing the tenant from the property.

Tenant's Options to Contest

Tenants in Maine have several options to contest an eviction:

  • Appeal: They can challenge the eviction in court if they believe it is unlawful or if due process was not followed.
  • Defenses: Tenants may present legal defenses, such as improper notice or retaliation.
  • Payment of Rent: During the notice period for nonpayment of rent, tenants can pay the owed rent to avoid eviction under Maine law.

Maine's eviction procedures are designed to be fair and just to both landlords and tenants, ensuring that the rights of both parties are protected during the eviction process.

Frequently Asked Questions

The eviction process in Maine is structured and regulated by state law, ensuring landlords have clear guidelines for legally removing a tenant. Tenants also benefit from knowing their rights during this process.

How long does it typically take to complete an eviction in Maine?

The duration of the eviction process in Maine can vary, typically taking from a few weeks to a few months depending on court schedules and the specific circumstances of the case. Information on the steps and timeline of eviction can be crucial for both landlords and tenants to understand the expected timeframe.

What are the legal reasons a landlord can evict a tenant in Maine?

Landlords in Maine have the legal right to evict tenants for reasons including non-payment of rent, violation of lease terms, and causing significant damage to the property. Detailed descriptions of these grounds for eviction are outlined in the Maine Revised Statutes.

Under Maine law, is it possible to evict a tenant during the winter months?

It is a common misconception that tenants cannot be evicted during the winter; however, Maine law does not prohibit winter evictions. Landlords must still follow the proper legal procedures regardless of the season.

What are the necessary steps to evict someone who has no lease agreement in Maine?

To evict a tenant without a lease, often referred to as a tenant at will, a landlord must provide a written notice to quit, respecting the notice period required by law. The subsequent steps remain similar to the standard eviction process.

How much is a landlord expected to spend on the eviction process in Maine?

The cost to evict a tenant in Maine can include court fees, service fees, and attorney fees if the landlord chooses representation. These costs can be substantial and may vary based on the complexity of the eviction case.

What is the procedure to evict a roommate or a tenant at will in Maine?

Evicting a roommate or a tenant at will requires serving an appropriate notice to quit. In the case of a roommate, if they are a co-tenant on the lease, standard eviction procedures apply. If not on the lease, they may be evicted as a tenant at will, but the notice period provided must be followed, and landlords should follow the legal process carefully to ensure compliance with state laws.


Table of Contents

Anchor
Get coverage in minutes

America's best-rated landlord insurance. No hidden cancellation fees. Competitive rates nationwide.

Get a quote

FAQs

Video Library

View all videos

Get coverage in minutes

No hidden cancellation fees. Competitive rates nationwide.

    Thank you! Your submission has been received!
    Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.